Horses & Life, the Beginning

By in , , , ,
Horses & Life, the Beginning

Here we begin my long anticipated addition of horses to EarthWise and the Alabaster Horse. Horses have, and still do, occupy a huge part of my life. It is hard to know where to begin with them. They have been present in my life from before my earliest memories and throughout each part of it. I can say horses have been one constant in my life.

I am considering including more about horses in this space. In these times of digital devices, the internet and the crazy fast pace our lives are expected to be, I find horses a haven. They are one of the things that does not change, just like the land.

What I will include is still in its infancy. A journey into the horse, how they live and think, and how we can learn to be the same for them is a definite. This sounds vague, but if you stick with me, it will become a compelling hunger to learn more. I know this to be true.

For now, a few things horse…

“There’s life here,” the boy said to the alchemist. “I don’t know the language of the desert, but my horse knows the language of life.”

Paulo Coelho

Horses are the epitome of life, and they live it entirely each and every second. They hold it sacred and strong. They don’t include just anyone in their Life. You have to earn it. Sometimes every second.

There is no truer feeling in the universe as that when a horse offers you its spirit in partnership.


Below, Wylie Gustafson and his band the Wild West perform the poem “Equus Caballus,” written by Joe Nelson. It’s a good one!

The song “Ponies” has always given me goose bumps. It was penned by Jeffrey Bullock and released in 1987 by Michael Johnson on his album Wings. Michael Martin Murphey also has released a recording of the song, as has John Denver. Note: YouTube was uncooperative with a different video of “Ponies” performed by John Denver with images of horses. You can find it at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pm4Id-_FVX8&list=PLJdac49tn8EERbxmXMCjNwIyR6ZJEIVqy&index=3

And, I will close with this thought to ponder, about the horse. I believe we can consider our true natures, or how we used to be long ago when humans were more connected to nature, in the same way.

In order to even begin to understand the language of the horse, we must first see him as he sees himself, that is, as an integrated being. For him, there is no segregation of senses, (the mind included), and whatever passes into his awareness is experienced with his entire being. What he thinks he feels and what he feels he thinks. All flows throughout him without hesitation or censor.

Susan Medenica
Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *